The Lovely Seaside Town of Nairn

Nairn is a lovely small seaside town of just under 10,000 people looking out on to the Moray Firth. Those numbers are swelled from spring onwards reaching a peak during the weeks of summer as tourists seek a holiday in this region. They are making a wise choice because Nairn itself, and the immediate vicinity, have much to offer. Accommodation is available with Nairn Holiday Rentals even having private options looking out on to the waters, Beach Cottage Nairn and Beach House Nairn. They make great bases for exploring the town and its hinterland.

Despite its northerly location, the climate is pleasant with the rains from the westerlies having generally fallen long before reaching Nairn. Visitors can also expect plenty of sunshine during the popular holiday weeks. Tourism is not new to Nairn; in Victorian times, visitors came in the belief that the local sea water had positive medical properties.

Today’s tourists will find pleasure boats in the harbour which was once filled by fishing boats who went out in search of herring. They can walk along the promenade, the riverside or the beach with the Moray Firth always in view.

The local Museum is a great place to learn more about Nairn and its history, including the fishing industry. When James VI visited in 1589 he was known to say that the High Street was so long that at one end the people spoke Scots and the other Gaelic. There were in fact two languages spoken in the region in those days with the land-based farming communities speaking Scots (Doric) and the fishermen Gaelic.

Nairn Museum in Viewfield House explains the centuries well with a plethora of permanent displays to reveal more to interested visitors. It is child-friendly with some exhibits able to be touched and a play area, and handicapped-friendly as well.

An interesting piece of history elsewhere is Cawdor House which dates back to 1370. It was the home of the Thane family and includes a dungeon, medieval tower, drawbridge below battlements and an interior which has lovely tapestries and original furniture. It is set in pleasant gardens and one of the best wooded areas found anywhere. Refreshment facilities mean visitors have no need to rush away for lunch. It is worth a few hours of your time.

The history of Nairn is illuminating and today’s market town retains the charm that it has always had; plan a visit.